Continuing professional development (CPD) courses for experienced coaches

We are pleased to introduce a series of options for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for experienced coaches and our Alumni. Our programmes aim to offer inspiring, experiential and highly practical development to enhance your coaching practice.

These sessions are very intimate with a restricted number of participants, as we want to create an incredible learning space and experience for you.

Who are our CPD courses aimed at?

  • Our CPD workshops and programmes are for experienced coaches and/or our alumni.
  • To attend our CPD workshops you will need to have completed previous coach training with us or be an experienced coach. An interview process is in place to assess potential participants for these workshops.

What CPD courses do you offer?

We are currently offering 3 CPD programmes:

  • A Gestalt Approach to Coaching (2 days)
  • Coaching the Unconscious Mind (2 days)
  • Coaching and Mindfulness (2 days)

These are detailed below.

For more information on any of the workshops or to book a place on one, just contact us today.

A Gestalt approach to coaching (2 days)

Writing about Gestalt is itself a contradiction in that experience in the moment is fundamental to the approach. Interpreting, structuring, organising information and reflecting are what you do when you write. In attempting to distil (or describe) the approach and make it understandable, we run the risk of sabotaging the very spirit of Gestalt. John Leary Joyce: Fertile Void – Gestalt Coaching at Work

Gestalt is a highly positive and practical integrative therapeutic approach, the principles of which have increasingly been assimilated into coaching and other non-therapeutic settings. Broadly, Gestalt practitioners help people to focus on their immediate thoughts, feelings and behaviour and to better understand the way they relate to others. This increased awareness can help people to find a new perspective, see the bigger picture and start to effect changes.

Some of the core principles of Gestalt that we will be exploring and actively experiencing during this module are:

  • Awareness – how greater awareness in the moment can support increased choices and the potential for change in ourselves and our clients
  • Boundaries – attending to what is ‘me’ and what is ‘not me’ and how we make meaningful and intentional contact or connection
  • Cycle of experience – experiencing closely how we interact through noticing our own patterns of ‘awareness’, ‘contact’, ‘action’, ‘integration’ and ‘closure’. We will also pay some attention of how interruptions to contact occur
  • Experiments – since Gestalt is concerned with the ‘here and now’ there is creative possibility for action in every moment; this can be quite playful!
  • Figure and ground – Some things are more important than others, and what we choose to pay attention to shapes the experience of our life

Gestalt: Noun an organised whole that is perceived as more than the sum of its parts 

The only way out is through – Fritz Perls

The zeitgeist in Europe in the 1930s was one of explosive change with new forms of expression emerging culturally and politically, with science and technology developing at pace. Against this backdrop, in Berlin, Fritz Perls became interested in some of the prevailing philosophical questions, particularly those concerning existence, what it is to be human, of consciousness and how we experience the world around us. Whilst working at the Frankfurt Psychological Institute, Perls met the psychologist and psychotherapist Lore Posner – later to become his wife Laura Perls. Together with the New York based thinker and writer Paul Goodman, the pair channelled their existential ideas and dissatisfaction with Freudian psychotherapy into their radical new humanistic therapy, with ideas about the self and awareness at its core. The underpinning ethos:

  • emphasised the importance of encouraging synthesis, to replace cold analysis, as a therapeutic method
  • called for a natural holistic approach to body and mind
  • encouraged a shift in the encounter and relationship between therapist and patient

Perls’ book “Gestalt Therapy” was published in 1951 and the first Gestalt institute was established in New York in the early 1950s. His book laid the groundwork for a new system of psychotherapy. This emphasises a phenomenological and subjective approach to therapy, noting that many of us split off our experience (thoughts, sensations, emotions) that are uncomfortable. One goal of his work was to encourage a shift for people into owning their experience and developing into a healthy gestalt (or whole). During the 1960s and 70s, Gestalt therapy rose to rapid and widespread popularity, especially in the USA. Today Gestalt is a well-established therapeutic process.

Faculty: Jenny Mackewn and Sally Bogle 

Jenny Mackewn is a highly experienced coach, organisational consultant, creative catalyst, facilitator and trainer. With a long career in business, in addition to executive and senior team development, coaching and mentoring, Jenny provides training and development programmes in dialogue, systemic coaching and facilitation/leadership as action research. A key emphasis of her work is on developing people as “heart-centred leaders intent on shaping a better world”. Taking a holistic perspective, Jenny specialises in applying Gestalt, systemic and complexity approaches to leadership, consultancy and change including:

  • Integrating planned and emergent change
  • Actively interweaving formal and informal aspects of the individual/organisational system
  • Working with organisations as complex responsive processes

Jenny applies this thinking in her work with individuals and groups. The centre of gravity for her practice is rooted in Gestalt, working with embodiment and systemic approaches. Other theories and practices are woven in, for example, constellations, action learning and creative dialogue and process.

She has written ‘Developing Gestalt Counselling’ (SAGE). Also, the chapter ‘Facilitation as Action Research in the moment’ in The SAGE Handbook of Action Research (Editors – Peter Reason and Hilary Bradbury)

Sally Bogle is a facilitator and coach with a strong belief in human potential and in the power of relationship and dialogue to create change. Her experience spans more than 15 years, working across a wide variety of organisations in the private, public and charity sectors. She began working independently in 2008, after several years heading up the L&D team at Unite Students. Her work focuses on leadership development, individual and group coaching and organisational change projects. She has also worked on several programmes to develop internal coaching and mentoring capacity and has been part of the TPCL Open Programme core faculty since 2011. Sally developed an interest in Gestalt early in her coaching career, through the experience of regular supervision with a Gestalt practitioner. She has an MSc in Organisational Development from a Gestalt Perspective, experience she has integrated into her 1:1 coaching work, particularly coaching leaders through change. Her study was also a process that enabled her to bring together and more fully integrate her various passions and interests that include mindfulness, action inquiry, the power of relationship, systemic constellations and a core belief in the inter-connectedness of all things.

Coaching the Unconscious Mind

Your client is your client out of rapport with their unconscious mind. Milton Eriksson

A major challenge within organisations continues to be the necessity for doing something different for the better. This recognised need to be innovative, creative and open to ‘newness’ is often stilted by the existing culture and a climate of blame and fear.

There is also an argument that goal-focussed coaching, whilst there is a place for this to leverage conscious change, may not produce the results sought after due to insufficient attention being paid to what is occurring unconsciously. To what extent is our unconscious mind aligned with what we want to do and achieve (the goal)?

This Master Coach module offers a highly experiential and integrative 2-day workshop within a safe environment. With a clear coaching focus, the module is designed for senior level coaches (internal or external) and other practitioners (e.g. organisation consultants and change agents) working with clients individually and/or collectively within organisations.

In addition to bringing new content, our intent is that it also serves to foster alignment and integration between concepts and models shared on the Senior Practitioner programme and other Master Coach modules. Delivery will also be emergent: modelling co-creation with participants in the moment, providing experience of how you can deepen your presence as a coach and draw more intelligence from the field, rather than models, tools and techniques.

As coaches, our intent and purpose is to provide a safe, facilitating space for our clients to become more aware of the choices they have and for the responsibility they have for taking action on their chosen route. If a client could change consciously, they would do this on their own. Yet so many issues are formed in our ‘unconscious’ mind.

Also, from our professional training thus far, we appreciate that a lot of what we do, how we behave (as human beings) are reflections of our underlying values, beliefs and attitudes (that we hold about ourselves, others and the wider system). Yet, whilst influencing the way we function, many of our values, associated beliefs and assumptions remain embedded in our unconscious.

Stephen Ray speaks of “listening to the rhythm of what is being said” or unsaid. So how, as coaches, could we be doing this more? How can we better release the power of our own unconscious? How might we facilitate the development of that capacity in others?

Some of the core principles of Coaching the Unconscious Mind that we will be exploring and actively working with experientially during this module are:

  • The divided brain: the left and right hemispheres; individual and organisational preference / dominance of focused activity; the impact this has on creativity and capacity for change
  • The theory of multiple brains: head, heart and gut – managing the risk of mistaking projection for intuition in our work as coaches
  • Conscious & unconscious minds – the importance of creating ‘alignment’
  • Accessing the ‘embodied’ state – the power of this in raising self-awareness as Coach and using Self as Instrument; encouraging this within our clients
  • Constellations – raising appreciation of our systemic ‘self’ and wider systems
  • Phenomenological vs ontological – potential gains and/or drawbacks as coaching approaches
  • Goal-setting – is it the goal that is key for your client or the ‘state’ of achieving the goal?
  • Acquiring language we can use as an engaging ‘offering’ to our clients

Given the experiential format, key question might be to ask yourself: how do I want to be – coming (and becoming) more fully into my capacities as a coach?

NOTE – this workshop concerns raising your awareness, acknowledgement and acceptance of what you bring as Self to your coaching. This is about adding to and further alignment to your Self as Coach – in other words, greater ‘inclusion’ or more of who you are, not about stopping what you currently do as a Coach, nor how you are as a Coach.

Faculty: Michael Cahill 

“One quality of leaders and high achievers in every area seems to be a commitment to ongoing personal and professional development.” Brian Tracy.

Michael studied Economics at Cambridge, before enjoying 16 successful years’ in the City as a top-rated equity analyst. Realising he was no longer enjoying working with spreadsheets and data and appreciating that in banking there was a culture of “working too hard and thinking too little” (that was not producing great results), he began his own development journey, which was to see him unite his love of ideas with working with people.

As a coach, trainer and facilitator, learning and growth remains his primary driver given its power to create transformation. Seamlessly combining high-level business experience with his coaching, his clients consider their work together to be ‘inspirational’ generating greater value for themselves, their teams and their business. His impressive range of skills and qualifications as a coach underpin one simple ambition – to create a space for conversations that deliver powerful shifts for people as they begin to think differently and see themselves and their potential in a new light. His clients experience true transformational change, while the experience itself feels gentle, sensitive, imaginative and progressive. His groundbreaking approach to analysing business and insight into value creation brings a unique edge to his professional coaching. His approach is underpinned by an incisive understanding of what is required to successfully lead large, complex organisations today.

Michael passionately pursues his own personal and professional development as a Coach and Facilitator/trainer. This passion has led Michael to attaining a European Coaching Certification, Group Mastery and NLP (Practitioner, Master Practitioner, Train-the Trainer). He is also a certified “Time to Think” Coach, Consultant and Teacher and a Practitioner in Systemic Coaching and Facilitation. These skills create a powerful combination for achieving truly effective, long-lasting results with both groups and individuals. Michael’s clients value his passion for growth, development and learning, his common sense and creative approach. But most of all they value his imagination.

Coaching and Mindfulness (2 days)

Some of the now much-discussed benefits of developing a mindful meditation practice speak directly to some of the biggest challenges that face us as coaches in serving our clients in the most helpful way, consistently. Benefits such as an enhanced ability to be present, calm and focused and having an increased sense of connection, empathy and compassion are at the core of good coaching. Many coaches report that developing a mindfulness practice has had more impact on their coaching and facilitation work than any other self-development they have done.

When you look at this list of benefits and add to it those connected with general health and wellbeing, it is also apparent that mindfulness can impact many aspects of your life. As such, it can also be hugely helpful to some clients, whether that means helping them to become more grounded and connected as a leader or coping better with vast workloads and stress.

In this workshop we will explore in more depth the benefits that becoming more mindful can bring to your coaching, and also when and how you might introduce mindfulness to clients.

Most importantly, mindfulness is practice not theory, and in order to really begin to understand what it is ‘to be mindful’, it is necessary to experience it – not just talk (or read) about it.

Module aims

This module aims to help you

  • learn what mindfulness is and is not
  • understand the neuropsychology and benefits of a mindfulness practice
  • learn techniques for presence, grounding and centring as coach
  • learn at least 3 mindfulness meditation practices
  • develop a sense of how mindfulness might benefit your practice as a coach.

Faculty

The workshops are facilitated by Sally Bogle. Sally Bogle is a facilitator and coach with a strong belief in human potential and in the power of relationship and dialogue to create change. Her experience spans more than 15 years, working across a wide variety of organisations in the private, public and charity sectors. She began working independently in 2008, after several years heading up the L&D team at Unite Students. Her work focuses on leadership development, individual and group coaching and organisational change projects. She has also worked on several programmes to develop internal coaching and mentoring capacity and has been part of the TPCL Open Programme core faculty since 2011. Sally developed an interest in Gestalt early in her coaching career, through the experience of regular supervision with a Gestalt practitioner. She has an MSc in Organisational Development from a Gestalt Perspective, experience she has integrated into her 1:1 coaching work, particularly coaching leaders through change. Her study was also a process that enabled her to bring together and more fully integrate her various passions and interests that include mindfulness, action inquiry, the power of relationship, systemic constellations and a core belief in the inter-connectedness of all things.

Dates and fees

  • A Gestalt Approach to Coaching – £695 + VAT
    • 9th & 10th January 2019
  • Coaching the Unconscious Mind – £695 + VAT
    • 12th & 13th March 2019
  • Coaching and Mindfulness – £695 + VAT
    • Dates to be announced

More information